School of Natural Resources and Environment

News and Research Digest

Passenger Pigeon Portrait Gallery

The passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in North America, was hunted to extinction. The Passenger Pigeon Portrait Gallery commemorates the centenary of the death of Martha, the last of the species, on September 1, 1914. The Portrait Gallery displays the work of 14 artists, each representing a state or area within the bird’s former nesting range. Audubon’s drawing of a pair of passenger pigeons (shown in the last case, right wall) inspired artists Steffi Domike and Ann Rosenthal to curate this collection of diverse portrait interpretations.

A list of the 40 most influential environmental justice conflicts in American history—compiled by students at the University of Michigan—has been added to a new "Global Atlas of Environmental Justice," an interactive online map detailing about 1,000 environmental conflicts worldwide. The atlas is a product of the European Union-funded EJOLT project (Environmental Justice Organizations, Liabilities and Trade), which is hosting a conference this month in Lund, Sweden.

SNRE Faculty book covers

U-M Faculty Authors Event, 3/20

The cover art for these books will be incorporated into a temporary digital exhibit in the Author’s Corner in the Hatcher Graduate Library.

Dan Brown, Land Use and the Carbon Cycle: Advances in Integrated Science, Management and Policy, Cambridge University Press
Raymond De Young and Thomas Princen, The Localization Reader: Adapting to the Coming Downshift, MIT Press

You've probably never seen a bird like this before.  

SNRE students have -- during a three-hour ornithology lab (EEB/NRE 433) where each student got to prepare their own study skin, the technical term for an animal that is prepared and stored for the purpose of scientific research.

Unlike taxidermied mounts, study skins are unposed and arranged in neat rows inside of airtight cabinets, usually inside of a natural history museum where they can stay for 200 years or more.

Dorceta Taylor in Washington D.C.

SNRE professor and Environmental Justice scholar Dorceta Taylor recently returned from Washington D.C. where she gave a Congressional briefing on her Food Security in Michigan Project. Taylor was invited to be one of the keynote speakers by the Association of Ecosystems Research Centers (AERC).

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